Delegates Also Authorize $6.37 Billion for 12 Peacekeeping Missions in 2021/22

Calling on all States to address new and emerging terrorist threats through investigations, information exchanges and cooperation, the General Assembly today held a debate on counter-terrorism and adopted a related resolution, and also approved more than $6 billion for 12 peacekeeping missions for the 2021/22 fiscal year.  (See Press Release GA/AB/4368.)

The Assembly unanimously adopted the resolution titled “The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy:  seventh review” calling upon Member States to take appropriate measures to address the new and emerging threats posed by the rise in terrorist attacks on the basis of xenophobia, racism and other forms of intolerance, or in the name of religion or belief.

By the terms of some of the resolution’s 119 operative paragraphs, the world body stressed the significance of a sustained and comprehensive approach, including through stronger efforts, where necessary, to address conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, bearing in mind that terrorism will not be defeated by military force, law enforcement measures and intelligence operations alone.

The Assembly also requested the Secretary-General, in consultation with Member States, to develop a greater understanding of the motivations, objectives, organization and the threat posed by such groups within the global terrorist landscape, including new and emerging threats, and to help to build, upon request, effective counter-narratives, capacities and strategies.

Taking up the Secretary-General’s latest report on activities in the Organization in implementing the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy (documents A/75/729 and Corr.1), the Assembly held a debate, with more than 20 Member States sharing experiences and raising concerns about current trends.

Delegates thanked Oman and Spain for their efforts and guidance in steering the intergovernmental process towards drafting the resolution, especially since the COVID-19 pandemic delayed the review process.  Some representatives said the seventh review of the Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy reflected new and emerging threats, while some called for enhanced cooperation to help States to effectively address such threats as online recruitment, aircraft hijacking and terrorist financing flows.

Turkey’s delegate, speaking also on behalf of Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea, Turkey and Australia, underlined the critical benefit and importance of the United Nations timely, adequate and effective delivery and facilitation of counter-terrorism capacity-building assistance to Member States upon their request.  Indeed, even with positive developments since the last review in 2018, terrorism and violent extremism persists in threatening collective security, he said.  As such, the international community must act with determination and ingenuity, working more closely to address this increasingly complex threat.

Saudi Arabia’s representative, speaking on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), recalled the challenging negotiation process, and commended efforts to achieve a consensus.  Highlighting several new additions to the resolution, including a recognition of such trends as the rise of hate speech, Islamophobia and attacks on cultural sites, he said counter-terrorism efforts should never be associated with any religion, nationality or ethnic group.  As such, he called on all United Nations entities to mainstream the name “Da’esh” to describe the terrorist group that is neither Islamic nor a State, welcoming the resolution for reflecting that distinction.

The representative of New Zealand, also speaking for Australia and Canada, said that despite progress, the Global Strategy’s current volume, compared with three operative paragraphs in 2006, threatens a loss of coherence.  Indeed, the difficult negotiations reflect divergent approaches to combating terrorism, he stated, also expressing concern at resistance to including language to enhance transparency and improve the monitoring and evaluation of United Nations counter-terrorism efforts.

On other matters, the world body adopted, without a vote, 18 resolutions, recommended by its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), including the approval of a $6.37 billion budget for the following peacekeeping operations:  the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO), United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA), United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA), United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) and the United Nations Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS).

The Assembly adopted a resolution approving a $510.25 million budget for the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) by a vote of 133 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with no abstentions.  It also adopted several resolutions approving budgets for among other things, the United Nations Logistics Base in Brindisi (UNLB), the United Nations Regional Service Centre in Entebbe and the peacekeeping support account.

Delivering statements during the counter-terrorism debate were representatives of Philippines, Poland, South Africa, Jamaica, United States, Japan and Colombia.  A representative of the European Union, in its capacity as observer, also delivered a statement.

The Assembly will meet again at 10 a.m. on Friday, 2 July, for a high-level meeting on middle-income countries.  It will continue its debate on counter-terrorism at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 July.

United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy

At the outset of the meeting, the General Assembly considered a draft resolution titled “The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy:  seventh review” (document A/75/L.105).

The representative of Israel, explaining her delegation’s vote prior to action on the draft, expressed disappointment at the inclusion of preambular paragraph 43, which justifies certain terrorist acts — including the “cold-blooded murder of civilians” — when such acts should be condemned outright regardless of context.  As a result, Israel disassociates from that paragraph, she said.

The Assembly then adopted the draft resolution without a vote.  By its terms, the organ stressed the significance of a sustained and comprehensive approach to address conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, while bearing in mind that terrorism will not be defeated by military force, law enforcement measures and intelligence operations alone.  It also called on Member States to highlight the important role of women in countering terrorism and violent extremism and urged Member States and United Nations entities to integrate a gender analysis on the drivers of radicalization to terrorism into relevant programmes.

On measures to address the conditions conducive to terrorism, the Assembly expressed concern over the global dissemination of terrorist content through the Internet — including materials from real-world attacks — and called on Member States to collaborate in the pursuit of developing and implementing effective strategies to counter terrorist narratives, including those relating to foreign terrorist fighters.

Regarding measures to prevent and combat terrorism, the Assembly called on Member States to ensure the criminalization and prosecution of terrorism offences in accordance with their obligations under international law and to consider promoting national sentencing policies, practices or guidelines in which the severity of penalties for offenders is proportionate to the gravity of their offences, while treating those prosecuted or convicted humanely.

The Assembly also called on Member States to take appropriate measures to address the new and emerging threats posed by the rise in terrorist attacks based on xenophobia, racism and other forms of intolerance, or in the name of religion or belief.  Further, it expressed concern over the increasingly and rapidly evolving use by terrorists and their supporters of information and communications technologies — particularly the Internet — to commit, incite, recruit for, fund or plan terrorist attacks, and over the potential use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes, calling on Member States to consider additional measures to address this issue.

The text also included operative paragraphs relating to building States’ capacity to prevent and combat terrorism and to strengthen the role of the United Nations towards this end.  On this point, the Assembly stressed the need to continue to provide capacity-building assistance to Member States, upon request, in counter-terrorism matters and recognized in this regard the need to contribute more resources for capacity-building projects.

On measures to ensure respect for human rights for all and the rule of law as the fundamental basis of the fight against terrorism, the Assembly, condemning the failure to take all feasible precautions to protect civilians, called on Member States and United Nations entities involved in supporting counter-terrorism efforts to continue to facilitate the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, as well as due process and the rule of law, when countering terrorism.

In explanation of vote after the vote, the representative of the Russian Federation, also speaking for Belarus, China, Cuba, Iran, Nicaragua, Syria, Venezuela and Zimbabwe, said that the international community had no choice but to adopt the resolution by consensus, and that agreement is even more important than the content of the text.  While supporting the advancements the resolution will bring to suppressing terrorist activity and bringing perpetrators to justice, she expressed regret that the resolution failed to address some of the most pressing contemporary issues in this area, including obstacles to effective multilateral cooperation and the need to improve international legal frameworks.  The resolution instead places a disproportionate focus on human rights, while the proponents of such language refrain from accepting their own shortcomings and, in certain instances, violations in this regard.  Further, she stressed that any attempts to silence certain delegations while promoting the priorities of others is “absolutely incompatible” with the principle of impartiality, suggesting that the Assembly elaborate a set of rules to guide future facilitators that respects the principle of sovereign equality among States.

The Assembly then began its general debate on the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, taking up the Secretary-General’s latest report on the matter (documents A/75/729 and Corr.1).

MOHAMED AL HASSAN (Oman) said that lively, complex negotiations on this issue demonstrated Member States’ capacity to arrive at consensus and steer a course towards future elimination of the menace of terrorism.  Oman, as co-facilitator of the draft resolution, endeavoured not to limit such negotiations to Member States, also listening to the viewpoints of civil society, governmental and non-governmental organizations and experts, which enriched the debate.  Combating terrorism and extremism requires international cooperation, and the international community must move away from double standards and “respect the convictions and religions of one and all”.  Noting that the primary responsibility to counter terrorism lies with Member States, he said that all efforts aimed at combating this threat can only succeed if they are based on a respect for human rights.  Much remains to be done, he added, but the international community can achieve tangible, satisfying results by working together.

DAVID IZQUIERDO ORTIZ DE ZÁRATE (Spain), noting that the Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy is essential because it offers a structure for shared collaboration, said that work on the draft resolution was guided by inclusion, transparency and dialogue despite COVID-19’s challenges to diplomatic negotiations.  While the outcome of the common effort adopted today is quantifiable in the form of 166 total paragraphs — more than 50 of them new — he said that the text’s qualitative aspect is even more important, and its adoption by consensus sends a clear political message:  “we stand united against terrorism”.  Specifically, the resolution addresses shifts in the counter-terrorism paradigm; the continuing threat posed by Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) and its related organizations to Europe, Asia and Africa; and the growing danger of spreading ideologies based on racism and supremacy.  It also reaffirms the essential role of women and considers how to address terrorists’ use of new technology in their commission of criminal acts.  While negotiations were not easy due to the complexity and political importance of the questions debated, he said that the results achieved will be useful to common efforts aimed at countering terrorism.

SILVIO GONZATO, representative of the European Union, in its capacity as observer, said this review provides an opportunity to refocus attention in view of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Highlighting some of the bloc’s priorities, he said respect for human rights and the rule of law must be the foundation for the fight against terrorism, and all States must abide to international law.  The resolution adopted represents a hard-won consensus, he said, also drawing attention to civil society’s essential role in fighting terrorism and the importance of considering the gender dimension.  Raising several concerns, he said some Governments use counter-terrorism efforts to silence human rights defenders.  In addition, the rights of victims of terrorism and humanitarian activities must be protected.  Emphasizing that violent extremism in all forms must be addressed, he regretted the omission of related language in the resolution.  Other areas needing action include removing terrorist content online.  Welcoming prevention efforts, he said it is fundamental to address inequalities and foster education to build well-integrated societies.  He also reiterated a call for a monitoring and evaluation mechanism to ensure that the Counter-Terrorism Strategy remains effective.

ABDALLAH Y. AL-MOUALLIMI (Saudi Arabia), speaking on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), recalled the challenging negotiations and many efforts made to address a broad range of concerns.  Throughout the process, differences were overcome with a broad view to preserving consensus.  Citing some of the new elements in the resolution, he noted such trends as the rise of hate speech, Islamophobia and attacks on cultural sites.  Counter-terrorism efforts should never be associated with any religion, nationality or ethnic group.  In this vein, he called on all United Nations entities to mainstream the name “Da’esh” and not to use any other terminology when referring to that terrorist group, as it is neither Islamic nor is it a State, and welcomed the resolution for reflecting that distinction.

CRAIG JOHN HAWKE (New Zealand), also speaking for Australia and Canada, pointed out that the COVID-19 pandemic has further deepened inequalities and isolation, thereby opening new avenues for terrorists to radicalize individuals to violence.  A collective response is required, but global counter-terrorism measures cannot be isolated from other international priorities and driven only by hard security measures.  He said that the best defence against terrorism is a resilient, inclusive society where individuals feel safe and violent extremist ideologies cannot take hold.  The Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy has received important updates towards this end, including more-nuanced language regarding the importance of protecting human rights in all counter-terrorism measures and acknowledging that such efforts can also inflict harm.

He also welcomed the Global Strategy’s better reflection of the reality that gender-based analysis is an important element of effective counter-terrorism responses, and of the need to engage with all stakeholders, including civil society, the private sector and religious groups.  Despite this progress, however, he stressed that the Global Strategy’s 100-plus operative paragraphs — compared to the original three in 2006 — threaten a loss of coherence, and that the difficult negotiations reflect divergent approaches to combating terrorism.  He also expressed concern at resistance to including language to enhance transparency and improve the monitoring and evaluation of United Nations counter-terrorism efforts and stated that independent human-rights oversight of such measures is essential to ensuring that they are consistent with the Organization’s values.

FERIDUN HADI SINIRLIOĞLU (Turkey), speaking also on behalf of Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea, Turkey and Australia, said that despite positive developments since the last review in 2018, terrorism and violent extremism conducive to terrorism still persist and pose a significant threat to collective security.  As such, the international community must act with determination and ingenuity, and work more closely to address this increasingly complex threat.  Highlighting the group’s related activities, he reiterated the need to adopt a comprehensive approach that would embrace essential security-based counter-terrorism measures and systematic preventive initiatives.  Terrorism and violent extremism conducive to terrorism cannot and should not be associated with any religion, nationality, civilization, or ethnic group.

Commending the inclusion of language on several areas, including on victims’ rights, he expressed hope that the Global Strategy will be updated to include references to new challenges and threats and to the important role that civil society, youth, local actors and other stakeholders play.  An effectively functioning United Nations system is essential to address the threat of terrorism and violent extremism conducive to terrorism globally, he said, anticipating that additional references in the updated strategy to the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism and the United Nations Global Compact entities will enhance strategic coordination and coherence.  He emphasized the critical benefit and importance of the United Nations’ timely, adequate and effective delivery and facilitation of counter-terrorism capacity-building assistance to Member States upon their request.

ENRIQUE MANALO (Philippines), welcoming the resolution’s adoption by consensus, pointed out that the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the global security landscape as border restrictions have caused terrorists to shift their operations into cyberspace, where they “spew narratives for a captive online audience”.  Recalling the 2017 siege on Marawi by a terrorist organization affiliated with ISIL/Da’esh and subsequent swift action by the Government, he stressed that, while Member States bear the primary responsibility to counter terrorism, the transnational elements of the Marawi incident demonstrate the need for a global strategy.  The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy “must remain a living document”, evolving with the times and shifting paradigms of terrorism while remaining responsive to the needs of Member States.  He, therefore, welcomed substantive updates in the Global Strategy’s current iteration, including ensuring adequate capacity and resources for the Office of Counter-Terrorism for the implementation of its mandate.

MATEUSZ SAKOWICZ (Poland), aligning himself with the European Union, underscored the need to keep the Global Strategy under review so that it reflects current realities and goals.  The United Nations remains a major actor on counter-terrorism issues, with its specialized entities and many efforts.  Encouraging further enhancing of coordination and coherence in the work of the United Nations system and beyond, he recalled a fruitful visit to Poland by the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate in 2019.  Highlighting several areas that need attention, he said efforts must foster and expand international cooperation.  Action is also needed to tackle the problem of the misuse of information and communication technologies, in particular the Internet and social media, by terrorist groups to radicalize, recruit and prepare attacks.  Initiatives must also focus on ways of stopping the recruitment and use of children to perpetrate terrorist attacks, and the violations and abuses committed by terrorist groups against them.  He underlined the importance of further developing inter-agency cooperation and exchange of information with foreign counterparts to stop terrorism financing.  Efforts must also continue to boost international cooperation to safeguard civil aviation against terrorist attacks, he said.

MATHU JOYINI (South Africa) said that the international community can only make progress in countering terrorism through cooperation, constant threat assessment and the sharing of information and best practices.  While South Africa supports the Global Strategy, she stressed that the new focus on extremism must concentrate on violent extremism conducive to terrorism, as not doing so could lead to the exploitation of the term for political purposes and the violation of fundamental rights and freedoms.  Noting that the regions of the world experience the threat posed by terrorist groups and the return of foreign fighters differently, she encouraged the development of partnerships with regional organizations given their appreciation and understanding of local and regional dynamics.  She also expressed concern over the emerging threat of terrorism in the Southern African region, and detailed national measures to address this issue, including the establishment of a Southern African Development Community (SADC) regional counter-terrorism centre.

DENIESE SEALEY (Jamaica), joining consensus on the draft resolution, said that, although the threat of terrorism is low in her country, terrorist activities have become more intertwined with organized crime.  Countries in the Caribbean region are also faced with the reality of nationals returning from conflict zones that may have been exposed to violent jihadist ideologies and seek to recruit and radicalize other individuals.  She stressed that the cross-border nature of this threat reinforces the need to share intelligence to facilitate detection of foreign terrorist fighters if they travel through the Caribbean region.  Detailing national measures to counter terrorism and violent extremism — including anti-money-laundering initiatives, strengthened immigration legislation, and a cyber-incident response team — she said Jamaica will continue to mitigate the threats posed by terrorism and organized crime by maintaining partnerships, facilitating capacity-building and sharing information and best practices among local, regional and international partners.

PATRICK KENNEDY (United States) said that the adoption of today’s resolution by consensus despite entrenched, divergent views is a notable achievement.  Although it is not perfect, the text does address critical issues that enjoy international agreement, and he welcomed language relating to proportionate national sentencing policies that reflect the gravity of certain offences while maintaining respect for human rights.  He also supported language relating to violent extremism based on racism, but expressed regret that ethnicity was not also discussed as a potential motivating factor.  Language relating to repatriation, however, is not commensurate with the gravity of that issue, as foreign terrorist fighters and their families living in camps in Syria and Iraq pose humanitarian and security crises.  Repatriation, rehabilitation, reintegration and prosecution, as appropriate, of foreign terrorist fighters is the best way to prevent the resurgence of ISIL/Da’esh in those countries.  He also stressed that the resolution should guide global counter-terrorism efforts — rather than constitute “yet another vehicle to unjustly criticize Israel at the United Nations” — and disassociated himself from preambular paragraph 43.

OSUGA TAKESHI (Japan) welcomed the resolution’s inclusion of four of Japan’s priorities relating to countering terrorism, namely:  cyberspace, maritime security, institution-building and root causes.  He said that the world’s growing dependence on information and communications technology due to the COVID-19 pandemic has invigorated terrorists’ online activity and propelled extremist narratives.  Consequently, it is necessary to enhance Member States’ capacity to leverage artificial intelligence and open-source information to counter terrorist financing though the dark web and cryptocurrency.  He also said that Japan, as an island nation, emphasizes the importance of peace and security at sea, welcoming the inclusion of, and wide support for, operative paragraph 64.  He added that Japan has contributed $30 million to the Global Maritime Crime Programme run by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to enhance the capacity of maritime law enforcement in Asia and Africa and encouraged other Member States to do the same.

GUILLERMO ROQUE FERNANDEZ DE SOTO VALDERRAMA (Colombia), condemning recent attacks in his country, said all societies are suffering from terrorist threats.  Efforts must recognize the links among terrorists, traffickers and organized crime networks.  With the new review, the international community has declared its commitment.  States must also commit to refrain from taking any actions that endanger peace and security, including financing terrorists or letting terrorists use their territory.  Local capacity-building is essential, he said, calling on the international community to tackle a range of issues.  These include breaking ties among terrorist and organized crime groups, as outlined in Security Council resolutions, and implementing the Global Strategy in full respect of human rights.  Efforts must also stop all indoctrination efforts by terrorist groups using the Internet.

Reports of Fifth Committee

The Assembly then turned to a package of draft resolutions contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), introduced by Committee Rapporteur Tsu Tang Terrence Teo (Singapore).  (For background, see Press Release GA/AB/4368.)

The Assembly first adopted the draft resolution “Financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors” contained in document A/75/665/Addendum 1, taking note of the audit opinions and findings, and endorsing the recommendations, contained in the report of the Board of Auditors (document A/75/5 (Vol.II)).

It then adopted the draft resolution “Special subjects relating to the programme budget for 2021” contained in document A/75/682/Addendum 2, appropriating an additional $212,000 (non-recurrent) under section 29A, Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance, of the programme budget for 2021.

In adopting the draft resolution “Seconded active-duty military and police personnel” contained in document A/75/935, the Assembly recognized the importance of the roles carried out, and expertise provided by, seconded active-duty military and police personnel in fulfilling United Nations mandates and requested the Secretary-General to continue to actively engage in efforts to improve their timely onboarding.

Taking up the report “Administrative and budgetary aspects of the financing of the United Nations peacekeeping operations”, contained in document A/75/936, it then considered four draft resolutions contained therein.

First, it adopted draft resolution I “Support account for peacekeeping operations” contained in document A/75/L.34, approving the support account requirements of $356.41 million for the financial period from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022.

Adopting draft resolution II, “Financing of the Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda” contained in document A/C.5/75/L.35, the Assembly approved $40.27 million for the maintenance of the Centre from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022.

Next, it adopted draft resolution III “Financing of the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy” contained in document A/75/L.36, approving the cost estimates for the Base totalling $65.69 million for 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022.

Adopting draft resolution IV, “Closed peacekeeping missions” contained in document A/75/L.32, the Assembly regretted that claims payable to troop- and police-contributing countries and outstanding dues to Member States from closed peacekeeping operation budgets have not been settled and emphasized its commitment to resolve this issue.  It also requested the Secretary-General to continue to take every measure necessary to reimburse troop- and police-contributing countries before the closure of any peacekeeping mission.

Turning to texts on individual peacekeeping missions’ budgets for the period 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022, the Assembly first adopted a draft resolution appropriating $280.58 million to the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA), contained in document A/75/937.

The Assembly then adopted a text appropriating $1.12 billion to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA), contained in document A/75/938.

It also adopted a text appropriating $57.67 million to the Special Account of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), contained in document A/75/939.

Next, it adopted a text on financing of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) contained in document A/75/940, deciding to appropriate to MONUSCO’s Special Account $1.12 billion.

It then adopted a text appropriating $44.19 million to the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), contained in document A/75/941.

The Assembly also adopted a draft on financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) contained in document A/75/942, by which it decided to appropriate $1.26 billion.

In a report on financing the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East, the Assembly considered two texts.

First, it adopted a draft on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) contained in document A/75/943, by which the Assembly would decide to appropriate $65.51 million.

The Assembly then adopted, by a recorded vote of 133 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with no abstentions, a draft resolution on the financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) contained in document A/75/664/Addendum 1, by which it would appropriate $510.25 million.

The Assembly then adopted a draft on financing of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) contained in document A/75/944, by which it decided to appropriate $1.20 billion.

In adopting a draft on financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) contained in document A/75/945, it decided to appropriate $60.91 million.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) contained in document A/75/681/Addendum 3, authorizing the Secretary-General to enter into commitments not exceeding $45.72 million for the Operation from 1 January to 30 June 2021, taking into account $240.18 million for the 1 July to 31 December 2020 period and $198.78 million for the 1 January to 30 June 2021 period previously authorized by the Assembly under the terms of resolutions 74/261C and 75/251 respectively.

Next, the Assembly adopted a text on financing of the activities arising from Security Council resolution 1863 (2009) contained in document A/75/946, appropriating $560.07 million to the Special Account for the United Nations Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS).

The Assembly also adopted a draft decision contained in document A/75/683/Addendum 2, by which it decided to defer until its seventy-sixth session consideration of reports from the Secretary-General on the final performance of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) and the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), as well as his report on the budget performance of the United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH) for the period from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020.

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