CHICAGO – In the two months since President Joe Biden declared a major disaster in Washtenaw and Wayne counties following the June 25-26 tornadoes, severe storms and flooding, the federal government has approved nearly $205 million to help Michiganders with disaster-related needs.

“FEMA and our federal and state partners are committed to the recovery in southeast Michigan,” said Scott Burgess, FEMA’s federal coordinating officer for the Michigan disaster recovery operation. “We will remain on the ground until the job is finished. We’ve been on it, and we’re staying on it,” he said.

Here’s a breakdown, by the numbers, for the first 60 days of recovery:

  • More than $122.3 million in Individual Assistance (IA) program grants awarded to nearly 42,000 homeowners and renters in Washtenaw and Wayne counties. These grants help pay for uninsured and underinsured losses and storm-related damage, including:
  • Nearly $99 million in FEMA housing grants to help pay for home repair, home replacement and rental assistance for temporary housing.
  • More than $23.3 million in Other Needs Assistance grants to help pay for personal property replacement and other serious storm-related needs—such as moving and storage fees and medical and dental expenses.
  • The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved 2,813 long-term, low-interest disaster loans for a running total of $82.6 million for Michigan homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and nonprofit organizations to repair, rebuild or replace disaster-damaged physical property and to cover economic injury from the June 25-26 storms and flooding.
  • In addition, nearly $1.1 million in claims have been paid to homeowners insured by the National Flood Insurance Program. FEMA mitigation experts have counseled more than 7,600 individuals on flood mitigation and insurance through FEMA’s outreach activities at local hardware store events and Disaster Recovery Centers.
  • The state of Michigan and FEMA have staffed and operated five Disaster Recovery Centers plus three FEMA Document Drop-off Centers, which provide one-on-one assistance to survivors. The centers have tallied nearly 19,500 visits by survivors.
  • FEMA has sent Disaster Survivor Assistance (DSA) teams to storm-impacted neighborhoods in Washtenaw and Wayne counties. These teams visit homes, businesses and nonprofit organizations to help residents register for assistance, identify and address immediate and emerging needs, and make referrals to other local, state, and voluntary agencies for additional support.
    • To date, DSA personnel have visited more than 24,000 homes and about 380 businesses; they have interacted with nearly 9,300 survivors and have registered more than 1,430 households for FEMA’s Individual Assistance program.

The last day survivors in Washtenaw and Wayne counties can register with FEMA for federal assistance is Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021. For even more information about Michigan’s recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4607

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Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency, or economic status. Reasonable accommodations, including translation and American Sign Language interpreters via Video Relay Service will be available to ensure effective communication with applicants with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and access and functional needs. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (including 711 or Video Relay). If you are deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech disability and use a TTY, call 800-462-7585.

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

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Author: Editor
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