AB 1356 strengthens protections, both online and at health care facilities, for patients seeking reproductive health care services

AB 1184 protects the privacy rights of people receiving sensitive health care services, such as reproductive health care and gender-affirming care

Governor lifts up California Future of Abortion Council convened by reproductive rights and justice organizations to safeguard and expand reproductive health care access in the state

SACRAMENTO – In the face of unprecedented attacks on women’s health care and reproductive rights throughout the country, Governor Gavin Newsom today announced the Administration’s participation in a new advisory group, the California Future of Abortion Council, to advance the state’s leadership on reproductive freedom and signed legislation furthering the state’s commitment to ensuring access to essential reproductive and sexual health care services. The legislation will protect the privacy of patients seeking sensitive health care services, including reproductive health care, and create new safeguards to protect patients and providers from harassment.

“California has been a leader in protecting access to sexual and reproductive rights, but as we’ve seen recently with unprecedented attacks on these rights, we can and must do more,” said Governor Newsom. “I applaud the establishment of the California Future of Abortion Council and look forward to its important work to advance our state’s leadership on this vital issue. I’m proud today to sign these two bills that demonstrate our dedication to strengthening and further protecting access to reproductive health care services in California.”

AB 1356 by Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan (D-Orinda) increases penalties for current crimes under the California Freedom of Access to Clinic Act and updates online privacy laws and peace officer training related to anti-reproduction-rights offenses. It creates new offenses arising from recording or photographing patients or providers within 100 feet of the entrance to a reproductive health services facility.

AB 1184 by Assemblymember David Chiu (D-San Francisco) protects the privacy rights of people receiving sensitive health care services, including reproductive health care and gender-affirming care, by ensuring patient information is kept confidential if they are not the primary policyholder for their health insurance.

This action comes in the wake of attacks on sexual health care and reproductive rights around the country, including the U.S. Supreme Court’s failure to block Texas’ ban on abortion after six weeks. California is a national leader on reproductive and sexual health protections and rights, and Governor Newsom’s actions today make clear that the state will remain a haven for all Californians, and for those coming from out-of-state seeking reproductive health services here. The Administration’s participation in the new “California Future of Abortion Council” – launched by Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California (PPAC), NARAL-Pro Choice CA, Black Women for Wellness, ACCESS Reproductive Justice, and National Health Law Program (NHelp) – will work in collaboration with researchers, advocates, policy makers, providers, patients and key constituents to identify potential challenges that currently exist or may arise, and recommend solutions that will continue the state’s reproductive freedom leadership.

In 2019, Governor Newsom signed a Proclamation on Reproductive Freedom, reaffirming California’s commitment to protecting women’s reproductive choices. The Governor has advanced investments to expand access to reproductive and sexual health care and signed multiple bills protecting reproductive freedom, including SB 374 earlier this year and SB 24 and AB 1264 in 2019.

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Author: Editor
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