Concluding its seventy-sixth session today, the Sixth Committee (Legal) upheld its tradition of consensus and approved without a vote 15 draft resolutions, along with a draft decision and a draft letter, marking the end of 29 socially distanced meetings over which members met — together but apart — to consider the evolving face of international law in a world still in the grips of the COVID‑19 pandemic.

However, despite being approved without a vote, the draft resolution “Crimes against humanity”, introduced by Singapore’s representative, garnered the majority of today’s debate.  Pointing out that consensus could not be achieved despite the draft’s coordinators convening seven rounds of informal consultations, he said that the discussions will provide a platform for the next session.

Mexico’s representative, disassociating from the resolution, said that the Sixth Committee — for the third time in a row — is adopting a text that goes no further than simply taking note of the International Law Commission’s draft articles on this topic.  This pattern is unacceptable, he stated, underscoring that it contributes to a gridlock in the consideration of the Commission’s products and adds to the list of issues trapped in cyclical debates.

Echoing that sentiment, Slovenia’s delegate, also speaking for European Union member States and others, emphasized that approval of the draft resolution signals inaction and falls short of the Sixth Committee’s responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations.  There is a gap, she said, in the current international treaty framework on the prevention and criminalization of crimes against humanity.

The representative of the United States, also noting the absence of a multilateral treaty on the prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity, said that this has left a hole in the international legal framework that should be addressed.  He joined others in supporting the establishment of a structured process to exchange substantive views on the draft articles.

Cognizant of its relationship with the International Law Commission on this and other topics, the Sixth Committee also approved a draft resolution concerning the Commission’s report on the work of its seventy-second session.  That text, among other provisions, would have the General Assembly stress the desirability of further enhancing the dialogue between the Commission and the Sixth Committee.

Peru’s representative, introducing that resolution, highlighted that it would also have the General Assembly note the Commission’s proposal for establishing a trust fund to support Special Rapporteurs — especially those from developing regions — in undertaking the research required to prepare reports.

The Committee approved another resolution aimed at providing monetary support for the progressive development of international law.  That text, concerning the United Nations Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law, would have the General Assembly authorize the Secretary-General to carry out the Programme’s activities financed from provisions in the regular budget.

The representative of Ghana, introducing that resolution, said that it would provide the mandate in 2022 for the organization and award of fellowships for the United Nations Regional Courses in International Law and the International Law Fellowship Programme, and for the development of the United Nations Audiovisual Library of International Law.

Brazil’s delegate, introducing the resolution on “Strengthening and promoting the international treaty framework”, highlighted not only how the text triggers an exchange of views between Member States regarding their treaty-making practice, best practices and other treaty-related topics, but welcomes Member States to address the current shortcomings in treaty registration.

On that point, the representative of Colombia, speaking for the Group of Friends of Spanish at the United Nations, spotlighted that the resolution makes it possible for any Member State to voluntarily submit courtesy translations to expedite the publication of treaties.  Championing the value of promoting multilingualism, she urged overcoming the view that doing so creates additional costs or slows down the Organization’s work.

Alya Ahmed Saif al-Thani (Qatar), Chair of the Sixth Committee for its seventy-sixth session, delivered closing remarks, thanking delegates for their flexibility and cooperation, which allowed the Committee to preserve its tradition of reaching agreement by consensus.  “It has been an extraordinary session, conducted under extremely difficult circumstances,” she said, adding that the Committee’s work was greatly facilitated by the interpreters, précis writers from the Meetings Coverage Section, conference officers, document officers, press officers and all technical personnel.

Also speaking today were representatives of Pakistan, Austria, Greece, United Kingdom, Israel, Syria, Mauritius, Indonesia, Canada and Croatia.

The Sixth Committee will meet again at a time and date to be announced.

Action on draft resolutions

The Sixth Committee first took action on the draft resolution “Criminal accountability of United Nations officials and experts on mission” (document A/C.6/76/L.12).

The representative of Pakistan, introducing that text, noted substantive changes to the text of operative paragraph 2, which has been amended such that the General Assembly would recall all of its relevant resolutions on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse and on United Nations action on sexual exploitation and abuse, in addition to the relevant report of the Secretary-General and an evaluation report by the Office of Internal Oversight Services that was issued this year.  Also noting various technical amendments, to the text of resolution 75/132, he added that the resolution will contribute to enhanced efforts to ensure the criminal accountability of United Nations officials and experts on mission.

By its terms, the Assembly would express its concern with respect to all alleged crimes on the part of United Nations officials and experts on mission, including allegations of fraud, corruption and other financial crimes.  It would also urge the Secretary-General to continue to ensure that his zero-tolerance policy for criminal activities, such as sexual exploitation and abuse, fraud and corruption, is fully implemented in a coherent and coordinated manner throughout the United Nations.  As well, it would call upon all entities in the United Nations to inform and to cooperate fully with the Office of Legal Affairs of the Secretariat in all cases involving allegations that a crime may have been committed by a United Nations official or expert on mission.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

Next, the representative of Austria introduced the draft resolution “Report of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law on the work of its fifty-fourth session” (document A/C.6/76/L.10), pointing out that the resolution is based on the one adopted in 2020 and incorporates the developments and recommendations set forth in the latest report of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL).

He detailed several provisions, including those that would have the General Assembly welcome UNCITRAL’s decision to take stock of developments in dispute resolution in the digital economy and take note of UNCITRAL’s decision to recommend the enlargement of its membership.  Noting that the text represents a consensus among delegations, he recommended that the Sixth Committee approve the draft resolution without a vote.

By its terms, the General Assembly would commend the Commission for the finalization and adoption of the Legislative Guide on Limited Liability Enterprises, the Legislative Recommendations on Insolvency of Micro- and Small Enterprises, the Mediation Rules, the Notes on Mediation and the Guide to Enactment and Use of the Model Law on International Commercial Mediation and International Settlement Agreements Resulting from Mediation and the Expedited Arbitration Rules.  It would also stress the importance of promoting the use of texts emanating from the work of the Commission for the global unification and harmonization of international trade law and urge States that have not yet done so to consider signing, ratifying or acceding to conventions; enacting model laws and encouraging the use of other relevant texts.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “United Nations Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law” (document A/C.6/76/L.21).

The representative of Ghana introduced the draft resolution, noting that operative paragraphs 2, 5 through 8 and 18 would provide the mandate in 2022 for the organization and award of fellowships for the United Nations Regional Courses in International Law and the International Law Fellowship Programme; the development of the United Nations Audiovisual Library of International Law; and the publication and dissemination of legal texts as well as for the websites maintained by the Office of Legal Affairs.  By operative paragraph 9, the General Assembly would request the Secretary-General to maintain resources in the proposed programme budget for 2023 and, pursuant to operative paragraph 3, authorize the Secretary-General to expand such activities using voluntary contributions.

Also by that text, the General Assembly would authorize the Secretary-General to carry out the Programme’s activities, financed from provisions in the regular budget.  Further terms would commend the Codification Division of the Office of Legal Affairs of the Secretariat for the cost-saving measures undertaken with regard to the International Law Fellowship Programme and the Regional Courses and would urge the Secretary-General to conduct interactive online workshops when the training programmes referred to in operative paragraph 2 cannot take place in person owing to the COVID‑19 pandemic.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Report of the International Law Commission on the work of its seventy-second session” (document A/C.6/76/L.16).

The representative of Peru, introducing the draft resolution, said that the text contains technical updates to the 2020 version, as well as updates reflecting the Commission’s work at its seventy-second session.  A preambular paragraph was changed to reflect that the International Law Seminar was not held in 2020 or 2021 due to the COVID‑19 pandemic.  She also detailed several provisions, including those that would have the General Assembly note the inclusion of the topic “Subsidiary means for the determination of rules of international law” in the Commission’s long-term programme of work, along with the Commission’s proposal for establishing a trust fund to support Special Rapporteurs — especially those from developing regions — in undertaking the research required to prepare reports.

By the text, the General Assembly would encourage the International Law Commission to account for the capacity and views of Member States — as well as the Commission’s workload — when including topics in its current programme of work.  It would also stress the desirability of further enhancing the dialogue between the Commission and the Sixth Committee and, in this context, encourage the continued practice of informal consultations between members of both bodies throughout the year.  Further, it would stress the importance of ensuring necessary allocations for the Commission and its secretariat in the regular budget, also appealing to States to continue to make urgently needed voluntary contributions to the United Nations Trust Fund for the International Law Seminar.  The General Assembly would additionally request the Secretary-General to provide the Seminar with adequate services, including interpretation, as required.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Protection of the Atmosphere” (document A/C.6/76/L.15).

The representative of Greece, introducing that text, congratulated the International Law Commission for concluding its work on this topic.  Noting that the current draft is the outcome of two rounds of informal consultations, he said it contains four preambular paragraphs and four operative paragraphs.  While the preambular paragraphs note the importance of this topic to international relations, the operative paragraphs express appreciation to the Commission and take note of the views and comments expressed during the debate on this item.  The text reflects the common views of all delegations on how best to proceed, he said.

By its terms, the General Assembly would welcome the conclusion of the work of the International Law Commission on the protection of the atmosphere and its adoption of the draft preamble and guidelines on the protection of the atmosphere and commentaries thereto.  The text would also have the General Assembly bring the draft guidelines to the attention of States, international organizations and all who may be called upon to deal with the subject, encouraging their widest possible dissemination.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Provisional application of treaties” (document A/C.6/76/L.13).

The representative of Colombia, introducing the draft, said the text recognizes the work of the International Law Commission and the Special Rapporteur, while considering the interests and concerns of all States in a balanced manner.  The draft resolution underlines the continuing importance of the codification and progressive development of international law, while also stressing the voluntary and optional nature of the provisional application of treaties.  Operative paragraph 5 requests the Secretary-General to prepare a volume of the United Nations Legislative Series compiling the practice of States and international organizations in the field of provisional application of treaties, as provided over the years, together with other relevant materials.  She recommended that the Committee approve the draft resolution without a vote.

By the resolution’s terms, the General Assembly would welcome the conclusion of the International Law Commission’s work on the provisional application of treaties, and its adoption of the draft guidelines and draft annex constituting the Guide to Provisional Application of Treaties.  It would also bring the Guide to the attention of States and international organizations for their consideration, thereby encouraging its widest possible dissemination.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Crimes against humanity” (document A/C.6/76/L.17).

The representative of Singapore, introducing the draft, noted that the coordinators convened seven rounds of informal consultations on the draft resolution, as well as an informal meeting for an initial exchange of views on the draft prior to the start of the Sixth Committee’s session.  While consensus ultimately could not be achieved during the available time, the discussions will provide a platform for the next session, he said.

The representative of Mexico, speaking in explanation of position before action, said that, for the third time in a row, the Sixth Committee is adopting a text that goes no further than taking note of the International Law Commission draft articles.  The pattern of conduct in these texts is unacceptable because it sends a message about the absence of serious discussion and contributes to a gridlock in the consideration of the Commission’s products and a new vicious cycle of inaction.  Further, this issue is then added to a list of ten issues which are trapped in cyclical debates.  Stressing that his delegation will not support a mere technical rollover, he recalled its active participation in the negotiations, with the goal of establishing a clearly defined road map with clear timelines and mandates.  Noting his delegation’s flexibility regarding the timeline and type of framework, he said the texts submitted fell short of these aspirations and, in fact, represent a step backwards.  Calling for the adoption of a decision deferring this agenda item to the next session, he said that would be a positive sign indicating that discussions remain open.  Noting that this is part of the Committee’s practice as with observer requests, he disassociated from this resolution.

The representative of Slovenia, also speaking for the European Union member States and others, said there is a gap in the current international treaty framework on the prevention and criminalization of crimes against humanity.  She noted with regret that the debate in this session did not lead to the establishment of a procedural pathway to examine the draft articles.  The resolution that will be approved today signals inaction and unwillingness to move beyond taking note of the draft articles for the third consecutive year.  It not only falls short of capturing the views of the majority of those represented here today, she said, but also falls short of the responsibility this Committee has under the Charter of the United Nations.  The group of States hopes that next year will bring a fresh window of opportunity to discuss this matter, she added.

The representative of the United Kingdom highlighted that all delegations agree on the importance of this topic.  Recalling how close delegates came to reaching agreement, he noted that while “ultimately, consensus eluded us”, the vast majority of States pushed themselves hard to be flexible.  When this matter returns to the agenda for the fourth time, all States will have had an opportunity to be ready to consider the next procedural steps, he said.

The representative of the United States said that, 75 years after the Nuremberg trials, there is not a dedicated multilateral treaty on the prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity.  The absence of such a treaty addressing crimes against humanity has left a hole in the international legal framework that he strongly believes should be addressed.  The International Law Commission’s final draft articles on the prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity are an important step, yet they can and should be modified in certain key respects.  The United States supports the establishment of a structured process to exchange substantive views on the draft articles, he said, adding:  “This process would be fully consistent with past practice.”

By the text, the General Assembly would express its appreciation to the International Law Commission for its continuing contribution to the codification and progressive development of international law and take note, once again, of the International Law Commission’s draft articles on prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity.  It would also decide to include this topic in the seventy-seventh session’s provisional agenda.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The representative of Israel, speaking in explanation of position after action, voiced disappointment about the text, noting that, given the Jewish people’s history, her State ascribes great importance to this topic.  Also spotlighting the divergence among States, she said it is important to create together a dedicated space where the views of all can be heard.  The Sixth Committee should not shy away from respectful dialogue on this or other matters, she stressed.

Next, the Committee turned to the draft resolution “Report of the Special Committee on the Charter of the United Nations and on the Strengthening of the Role of the Organization” (document A/C.6/76/L.7), which was introduced on 10 November (for background, see Press Release GA/L/3653).

By its terms, the General Assembly would decide that the Special Charter Committee shall hold its next session from 22 February to 2 March 2022 and request the Special Charter Committee, at that session, to continue its consideration of all proposals concerning the question of the maintenance of international peace and security.  In this context, it would also request that the Special Charter Committee consider other proposals relating to that topic, including strengthening the relationship and cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations or arrangements and the question of the implementation of the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations relating to assistance to third States affected by the application of sanctions.

Further terms would have the Assembly recognize the important role of the International Court of Justice in adjudicating disputes among States, commend the Secretary-General for the progress made in the preparation of studies for the Repertory of Practice of United Nations Organs and reiterate its call for voluntary contributions to the trust fund for the elimination of the backlog in the Repertory.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Fortieth anniversary of the Manila Declaration on the Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes” (document A/C.6/76/L.8), which was introduced on 10 November (for background, see Press Release GA/L/3653).

That text would have the General Assembly recognize the Manila Declaration on the Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes as a concrete accomplishment of the Special Committee on the Charter of the United Nations and welcome the fortieth anniversary of its adoption while reiterating its call to all States to observe and promote the Declaration.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

Next, the Committee considered the draft resolution “The rule of law at the national and international levels” (document A/C.6/76/L.9), which was introduced on 10 November (for background, see Press Release GA/L/3653).

By its terms, the General Assembly would stress the importance of adherence to the rule of law at the national level and the need to strengthen support to Member States, upon their request, in the domestic implementation of their respective international obligations through enhanced technical assistance and capacity-building.  It would also call for dialogue to be enhanced among all stakeholders with a view to placing national perspectives at the centre of rule of law assistance in order to strengthen national ownership.  Further, it would call on the Secretary-General and the United Nations to systematically address aspects of the rule of law in relevant activities — including the participation of women in such activities — while recognizing the importance of the rule of law to virtually all areas of United Nations engagement.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The representative of Syria, speaking in explanation of position after action, disassociated himself from consensus on operative paragraph 3 due to it taking note of the Secretary-General’s report on strengthening and coordinating United Nations rule of law activities.  That report mentions the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism for Syria, and that Mechanism’s creation violates several provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “The scope and application of the principle of universal jurisdiction” (document A/C.6/76/L.14).

The representative of Mauritius, introducing the text, noted that it is based on last year’s text with necessary technical updates.  Drawing attention to the one change that goes beyond the technical, she said that the text would have the General Assembly invite a working group of the Sixth Committee to consider and comment on the question “what should be the role and purpose of universal jurisdiction” in its discussions on the topic during the seventy-seventh session.  As well, by the text, the General Assembly would also invite Member States and relevant observers to the Assembly to submit, before 29 April 2022, information and observations on the scope and application of universal jurisdiction and request the Secretary-General to submit a report based on the same to the Assembly at its seventy-seventh session.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

Next the Committee took up the draft resolution “Protection of persons in the event of disasters” (document A/C.6/76/L.20).

Introducing that text, the representative of Indonesia, speaking on behalf of the draft’s coordinator, said the proposal reflects the coordinator’s “fall-back” proposal, which aims to establish a way forward for work on this agenda item by representing the centre among the various positions.  According to operative paragraph 5, the goal is for the working group to report to the Sixth Committee at the General Assembly’s seventy-ninth session on its outcome, he said, noting that operative paragraph 6 asks the Assembly to encourage Member States to continue the substantive dialogue on an informal basis intersessionally.  In addition, by operative paragraph 7, the Assembly would consider this agenda item again at its seventy-eighth session in 2023.

That text would also have the General Assembly decide to examine the draft articles and to consider further the recommendation of the International Law Commission for the elaboration of a convention by the General Assembly or by an international conference of plenipotentiaries on the basis of the draft articles, or any other potential course of action with respect to the draft articles.  Such consideration would also be in light of the views and comments expressed in the debates of the Sixth Committee, as well as the comments and observations received from Governments, within the framework of a working group of the Committee, to be convened for four full consecutive days at the seventy-eighth and seventy-ninth sessions of the Assembly.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then took up the draft resolution “Strengthening and promoting the international treaty framework” (document A/C.6/76/L.19).

The representative of Brazil, introducing the draft resolution, said the text creates a platform for the review of the regulations to give effect to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations.  In addition, it allows Member States to address the current shortcomings in treaty registration and triggers an exchange of views among Member States regarding their treaty-making practice, best practices and other treaty-related topics.  The draft resolution contains a few new paragraphs, and includes the amended regulations as an annex, she noted, adding that the Committee managed to achieve consensus on those amendments after thorough and technical deliberations.

By its terms, the text would have the General Assembly welcome the organization of workshops on treaty law and practice by the Treaty Section at Headquarters and encourage the Treaty Section to continue to organize these workshops as regularly as possible, including through the use of information and communications technology when necessary.  It would also have the Assembly welcome efforts to build the capacity of States in treaty law and practice and call upon the Secretary-General to ensure the expedited publication of the United Nations Treaty Series.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The representative of Colombia, speaking in explanation of position after action for the Group of Friends of Spanish at the United Nations, said that multilingualism provides members of the public who wish to get involved in the Organization’s work with greater opportunity to do so.  She spotlighted that the resolution makes it possible for any Member State to voluntarily submit courtesy translations to expedite the publication of treaties and urged overcoming the view that multilingualism creates additional costs or slows down the Organization’s work.

Next, the Committee took up the draft resolution “Measures to eliminate international terrorism” (document A/C.6/76/L.11).

The representative of Canada, introducing that text, noted the general agreement among delegates to avoid replication of the General Assembly’s review of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.  Therefore, the text is mostly a technical update, she said, noting various changes in preambular paragraphs.  Operative paragraph 3 has been updated to include a reference to the forthcoming review of the Strategy, she noted, voicing the hope that next year, delegations can be inspired to incorporate a gender perspective into the text or its future iteration.

By the text, the General Assembly would urge all States that have not yet done so to consider becoming parties to the relevant conventions and would call upon all States to cooperate to prevent and suppress terrorist acts.  Further, it would urge all States and the Secretary-General to make the best use of the existing institutions of the United Nations.  The text, which would have the Assembly note that the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre is supporting the implementation of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, would also encourage all Member States to collaborate with the Centre and to contribute to the implementation of its activities.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee then turned to the agenda item “Administration of Justice at the United Nations”.

The representative of Croatia, introducing a draft letter from the Chair of the Sixth Committee to the President of the General Assembly on that topic, stated that the draft letter underlines the importance of the independence of the judiciary.  It also emphasizes the need for knowledge of the internal system of administration of justice and for outreach activities and underlines the importance of transparency and consistency of jurisprudence and judicial directions.

He also noted that, regarding the informal system of internal justice, the draft letter emphasizes that informal dispute settlement was a crucial component of the internal system for the administration of justice.  It also supports the consideration by the Office of the United Nations Ombudsman and Mediation Services of a pilot project to increase utilization of mediation for workplace disputes.  He recommended that the draft letter be approved without a vote.

The Chair recommended that the letter be sent to the President of the General Assembly and noted that, following past practice, the letter would contain a request that it be brought to the attention of the Chair of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) and circulated as a document of the General Assembly.

The Sixth Committee authorized the Chair to sign the letter and forward it to the President of the General Assembly.

The Committee then turned to the draft resolution “Report of the Committee on Relations with the Host Country” (document A/C.6/76/L.6), which was previously introduced by the representative of Cyprus.  (See Press Release GA/L/3653.)

By its terms, the General Assembly would strongly urge the host country to remove all remaining travel restrictions imposed by it on staff of certain missions and staff members of the Secretariat of certain nationalities.  It would also note that the Committee acknowledges the lifting of the more stringent travel restrictions applicable to one mission, while remaining concerned about the more stringent travel restrictions that continue to affect another mission and the statements of affected delegations that travel restrictions impede their ability to carry out their functions and negatively impact their staff and families.

In addition, the General Assembly would express serious concern regarding the non-issuance of entry visas to certain representatives of certain Member States and stress the need for the permanent missions and the United Nations to benefit from appropriate banking services.

The Sixth Committee approved the draft resolution without a vote.

The Committee next took up the draft decision “Provisional programme of work of the Sixth Committee for the seventy-seventh session” (document A/C.6/76/L.22), under the agenda item “Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly”.  Debate on this agenda item was held on 10 November and the Chair pointed out that a slightly revised version of the proposed programme of work introduced on that date was transmitted to all delegations.  The draft decision reflects that proposed programme.  (For background, see Press Release GA/L/3653.)

The Sixth Committee approved the draft decision without a vote.

Election of Officers

ALYA AHMED SAIF AL-THANI (Qatar), Chair of the Sixth Committee, then turned to the item on the election of the officers of the Main Committees, noting that as per General Assembly resolution 72/313, concerning the “pattern for the rotation of the Chairs of the Main Committees of the General Assembly”, the Chair of the Sixth Committee for the seventy-seventh session will come from the African Group.  The Committee will meet one more time during the present session of the General Assembly to elect the Bureau for the seventy-seventh session, she said, proposing that regional groups hold consultations in due course to ensure that the Committee will be in a position to elect its next Chair, three Vice-Chairs and a Rapporteur.

Closing Remarks

Ms. AL-THANI, noting the end of the substantive part of the session, pointed out that the Sixth Committee discussed 22 substantive agenda items over 29 meetings and adopted 19 draft resolutions and 9 draft decisions.  “It has been an extraordinary session, conducted under extremely difficult circumstances,” she said, thanking delegates for their flexibility and cooperation, due to which, the Committee was able to preserve its tradition of reaching agreement by consensus.  Also expressing gratitude to her colleagues in the Bureau and the Codification Division, she added that the work of the Committee was also greatly facilitated by the interpreters, précis writers from the Meetings Coverage Section, conference officers, document officers, press officers and all technical personnel.

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