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The Security Council heard the annual briefing from the Chairs of its three counter-terrorism Committees today, as members underlined the need for greater cooperation among the three bodies to better address evolving global threats.

Trine Skarboevik Heimerback (Norway), Chair of the Security Council Committee pursuant to resolutions 1267 (1999), 1989 (2011) and 2253 (2015) concerning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), also known as Da’esh, Al-Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities, said that, since her last briefing to the Council in December 2021, the United Nations, Member States and international and regional organizations, among other things, have continued to implement sanctions measures to prevent ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and their affiliates from undermining prospects for international peace and security.

In some regions in Africa, particularly in Southern and West Africa, the situation further deteriorated during the reporting period, she continued.  Also concerning are ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida’s active presence in Central and South Asia and the Levant, she said, adding that the implications of the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan also remains a major concern.  Turning to north-eastern Syria, she said the situation in prison and detention facilities there is a constant concern.  Further, the international community must do more to address the threat of foreign terrorist fighters.

Given the ongoing global terrorist threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and their affiliates, and evolving trends and emerging challenges, the 1267 sanctions regime must remain a high priority on the global counter-terrorism agenda, she stressed.  Member States must continue their proactive engagement with the Committee and the Monitoring Team, as this is essential for keeping the sanctions list up to date and ensuring the effective operation of the sanctions regime, she said.

Ms. Heimerback also spoke on behalf of the Chairs of the three counter-terrorism Committees, noting that despite the coronavirus pandemic, the subsidiary bodies continued to cooperate and coordinate their work to ensure an effective and efficient approach to counter-terrorism and to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery by non-State actors.  Outlining a range of activities undertaken during the reporting period, including open briefings and informal working lunches, on topics ranging from ISIL (Da’esh) in Africa to transitional justice and terrorism in the Lake Chad Basin, she said the three Committees will continue to cooperate and coordinate their work under their respective mandates, including through joint visits at the invitation of States.

Meanwhile, the three experts’ groups will also continue to work under the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Compact working groups towards achieving the objectives of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, she went on.  Furthermore, the Committees reaffirm their continued commitment to supporting Member States in those global efforts by providing guidance and direction to their expert groups to strengthen their collaboration and cooperation in line with relevant Security Council resolutions.

Ruchira Kamboj (India), Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1373 (2001) concerning counter-terrorism, said that during 2022, the Committee held several open and closed briefings, addressing a variety of regional and thematic topics relevant to the implementation of Council resolutions.  The Committee focused on the Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia and several parts of Africa, as the terrorist threat continues to persist and grow in these regions.  It also focused on thematic areas, such as countering terrorist narratives; preventing and countering the use of the Internet and new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes; inviting the participation of civil society in the Committee’s briefings and open meetings, among other topics.

Juan Ramón de la Fuente Ramírez (Mexico), Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004), reported that although States have made significant progress towards the full implementation of the resolution, this remains a long-term task, requiring enhanced cooperation among the three Committees.  While in 2021 the Committee postponed a number of planned activities due to the pandemic, it nevertheless continued with its comprehensive review process through open-ended consultations with States, international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations and academia, among others.  Following the renewal of its mandate in February 2022, it has continued to promote the full and effective implementation of resolution 2622 (2022); assist States, upon request, on strengthening national capacities; and has participated in 19 outreach activities.

In the ensuing discussion, the United States’ representative expressed concern that a permanent member of the Council is seeking to obstruct cooperation between the 1540 and 1267 Committees and the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, despite their clear mandates for such cooperation.  He also expressed disappointment that the 1267 Committee has only agreed to designate one entity since the start of the year.  The politicization of such issues only benefits terrorists, he added.

Meanwhile, the delegate of the Russian Federation stressed that one of the 1267 Committee’s priority tasks remains expanding the Council’s anti-terrorism sanctions regime to cover individuals and organizations that are members or direct affiliates of the Afghan branch of ISIL (Da’esh).  The growing competition between ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida over sources of funding, media resources and new converts, as well as other factors, including a struggle for leadership in such groups, have led to an increase in terrorist activity, along with an update in the tactics and methods employed by such groups, she added.

The representative of the United Arab Emirates was among several delegates who welcomed the adoption of the “Delhi Declaration on countering the use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes” at a special meeting convened by the Counter-Terrorism Committee in October, as a response to the collective threat posed by technologies, including the deployment of uncrewed aerial vehicles.  He emphasized the need for the international community to avoid inadvertently lending credibility to terrorist narratives which exploit religion to justify their crimes, reiterating his country’s call on Member States and the United Nations system to use ‘Da’esh’ instead of ‘Islamic State’, ‘ISIL’ or ‘ISIS’, “as there is nothing Islamic about terrorism”.

For his part, Brazil’s representative took aim at listing requests, noting that when they are submitted to the 1267 Committee, they are presented only with allegations that any given individual or entity fulfils the criteria of association with ISIL (Da’esh) or Al-Qaida, not with proper evidence “except for the back channel of bilateral inter-agency communications between select partners”.  Listing requirements should be submitted with supporting evidence, so that all Committee members can judge every request on its own merit and avoid the politicization of listing requests.

Nonetheless, the representative of Kenya stressed:  “The evolving nature of the threat posed by terrorists and other non-State actors requires us to be ahead of the curve.”  Member States must also implement asset freezes and travel bans on sanctioned individuals, groups and entities so as to curb the planning and execution of terror attacks as well as to combat illicit financial flows involving terrorists and other non-State actors, he added.

Also speaking today were representatives of China, Mexico, Norway, India, Gabon, France, United Kingdom, Ireland, Albania and Ghana (Council President for November in his national capacity).

The meeting began at 10:11 a.m. and ended at 12:04 p.m.

Briefings

TRINE SKARBOEVIK HEIMERBACK (Norway) spoke on behalf of the Chairs of the Committee established pursuant to resolutions 1267 (1999), 1989 (2011) and 2253 (2015) concerning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), also known as Da’esh, Al-Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities; the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1373 (2001) concerning counter-terrorism; and the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004).

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, the three subsidiary bodies continued to cooperate and coordinate their work to ensure an effective and efficient approach to counter terrorism and to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery by non-State actors, she said.

In February 2022, the Counter-Terrorism Committee held an open briefing on the work of the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate with Member States of South and South-East Asia pursuant to Security Council resolution 2395 (2017), with the participation of experts from the 1267 Monitoring Team.  The briefing called on regional Member States to highlight their efforts in implementing counter-terrorism measures mandated by the Security Council.

On 7 April 2022, the Counter-Terrorism Committee and the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee, supported by Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate and the Monitoring Team, held a joint open briefing titled:  “ISIL in Africa:  nature of threat and responses”, which was attended by representatives of Member States, analysts, policymakers, civil society organizations, and researchers.  The discussions addressed the evolution of the threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh) in Africa, focusing on Member States’ responses to the emerging threats, progress achieved, and persistent challenges.

Further, she reported, the Monitoring Team and Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate cooperated during an informal working lunch held for the Permanent Missions to the United Nations of eight African States on “Transitional Justice and the terrorist threat in the context of the Lake Chad Basin:  challenges and opportunities”, exploring the opportunities and possible challenges of applying transitional justice approaches to address the impact of terrorism in Africa and in the Lake Chad Basin region; and during a workshop on terrorism in the Great Lakes region of Africa, where the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate and the Monitoring Team explained the contours of the international counter-terrorism framework.  They also interacted during an informal working lunch held for the Permanent Missions to the United Nations of the Pacific region, aimed at discussing challenges that Member States face in the region, in particular small island developing States.

During the reporting period, the Analytical Support and Sanctions Monitoring Team and the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate continued to cooperate closely in the preparation of mandated reports of the Secretary-General on the global terrorist threat, she continued.  Outlining the reports’ findings, which found that the threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh) and its affiliates continued to rise and remained high in conflict-affected areas, with potential spill over to non-conflict areas, with the group and its affiliates continuing to exploit security gaps to recruit, organize and execute complex attacks, despite recent leadership losses.  The reports further noted that the potential impact of global food insecurity might exacerbate existing conditions conducive to terrorism and increase the current threat posed by the group.

Throughout the year, the Acting Executive Director of the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate, the Coordinators of the 1540 Group of Experts and the Monitoring Team held periodic trilateral consultations, she continued, adding that members of the three Expert Groups also attended quarterly briefings by the 1267 Coordinator.  Meanwhile, the Monitoring Team and the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate continued to interact with the Financial Action Task Force, including its Global Network of Financial Action Task Force-style regional bodies.

From 28 to 29 October 2022, the Counter-Terrorism Committee convened a special meeting on “Countering the use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes” in Mumbai and New Delhi, India.  It was attended at the Ministerial level by Member States of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, including India, as well as high-ranking officials from other United Nations Member States and United Nations entities, among others, and led to the adoption of the outcome document, the “Delhi Declaration on countering the use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes”.

The 1540 Group of Experts has continued to assist the Committee in carrying out its mandate under relevant resolutions, she noted.  The Monitoring Team also joined the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate to lead awareness-raising efforts with Member States regarding the enhanced implementation of travel ban measures, including the effective usage of the Consolidated United Nations Security Council Sanctions List.

The three Committees will continue to cooperate and coordinate their work under their respective mandates, including through joint visits at the invitation of States, to ensure an effective and efficient approach to counter terrorism and to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery by non-state actors, she said.  Meanwhile, the three experts’ groups will also continue to work under the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Compact working groups working to achieve the objectives of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.  Furthermore, the Committees reaffirm their continued commitment to supporting Member States in those global efforts by providing guidance and direction to their expert groups to strengthen their collaboration and cooperation in line with relevant Security Council resolutions.

Ms. HEIMERBACK (Norway), Chair of the Security Council Committee pursuant to resolutions 1267 (1999), 1989 (2011) and 2253 (2015) concerning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities, said that since her last briefing to the Council in December 2021, the United Nations, Member States and international and regional organizations have continued to implement sanctions measures to prevent ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and their affiliates from undermining prospects for international peace and security.  To further promote awareness of the use of the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida sanctions framework, on 17 December 2021 the Council adopted resolution 2610 (2021), which reaffirmed the assets freeze, travel ban and arms embargo measures imposed against all designated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities on the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida sanctions list.  It also extended the mandates of the Analytical Support and Sanctions Monitoring Team and the Ombudsperson for 30 months until June 2024.

Underscoring the critical role of the Monitoring Team and the Ombudsperson in implementing the 1267 sanctions regime, she said that Member States must engage with, and provide updated information to, the Committee and the Monitoring Team on the evolving nature of the terrorist threat, listed individuals and entities and the status of the implementation of the sanctions measures at the national level.  Drawing attention to the requirement set out in resolution 2610 (2021) to submit updated reports on the assets freeze and exemptions thereto, she said the Secretariat, in cooperation with the Monitoring Team, developed a format for reporting, which is available online.  Pursuant to resolution 2610 (2021) and as per the note verbale dated 23 September, Member States were called upon to report to the Committee by 1 November, she said, encouraging those who still have not submitted their reporting to do so.  During the reporting period, the Monitoring Team has continued to provide regular updates to the Committee on the global terrorist threat.  It noted that the threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida remains moderate in non-conflict zones, but is much higher in areas directly affected by conflict, she added.

The situation in Africa, particularly in Southern and West Africa, further deteriorated during the reporting period, she continued.  Central and South Asia and the Levant, where both ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida are actively present, as well as the implications of the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan, remain a major concern.  The phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters remains a serious problem and the international community must do more to address this threat.  Turning to north-eastern Syria, she said the situation in prison and detention facilities there is a constant concern.  The attack by ISIL (Da’esh) on Al Sina’a prison in Al‑Hasakah in January led to the escape of between 100 and 300 fighters, she said, adding that Member States consider that more jailbreak attempts are likely.  Despite the losses of some senior figures, most notably the ISIL (Da’esh) leader Amir Muhammad Sa’id Abdal-Rahman al-Salbi and Al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, reportedly killed in Kabul, ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida continue to take advantage of conflicts and governance failures to recruit followers and attract resources.  The global economic slowdown may increase the potential for a further spread of terrorist activities by ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida, she warned.

For a more detailed analysis, Member States can refer to the periodic reports of the Monitoring Team published on the Committee’s website, she said, noting that the Team’s analysis is largely based on field visits.  Although traveling remains a challenge, she said the Monitoring Team managed to conduct important visits to Africa, Europe, Central and South Asia and the Middle East, including Iraq, and convened the Vienna regional meeting of intelligence and security services of the Middle East and North Africa.  During the reporting period, the Committee continued its mandated activities and held nine in-person meetings, including a joint open briefing with the Counter-Terrorism Committee on the theme “ISIL in Africa:  nature of threat and responses”.

The Committee, in partnership with the Secretariat, maintains its sanctions list and ensures that the list is accurate and promptly updated, she said, noting that there are currently 255 listed individuals and 88 entities.  Since the beginning of the year, the Committee has agreed to add one entity to its sanctions list and approved amendments to the existing entries of seven individuals and one entity.  The Committee also approved the delisting of three individuals following a review by the Ombudsperson, as well as the delisting of five individuals and three entities following the 2020 annual review, she added.  Proposals to list one entity and 17 individuals remain on hold.  Following the resignation of Daniel Kipfer Fasciati, Richard Malanjum was appointed as the new Ombudsperson and effectively assumed his duties.  Currently, seven requests for delisting are pending with the Office of the Ombudsperson.

Given the ongoing global terrorist threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and their affiliates, and evolving trends and emerging challenges, the 1267 sanctions regime must remain a high priority on the global counter-terrorism agenda, she stressed.  Member States must continue their proactive engagement with the Committee and the Monitoring Team, as this is essential for keeping the sanctions list up to date and ensuring the effective operation of the sanctions regime, she said.

RUCHIRA KAMBOJ (India), Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1373 (2001) concerning counter-terrorism, said that during 2022, the Committee held several open and closed briefings, addressing a variety of regional and thematic topics relevant to the implementation of Council resolutions.  The Committee focused on the Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia and several parts of Africa, as the terrorist threat continues to persist and grow in these regions.  It also focused on thematic areas, such as countering terrorist narratives; preventing and countering the use of the Internet and new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes; inviting the participation of civil society in the Committee’s briefings and open meetings; underscoring the importance of protecting human rights when countering terrorism; and incorporating the full, equal and meaningful participation of women in counter-terrorism responses.

She went on to note that the Committee organized an open briefing on 14 February, focusing on the terrorist threat in South and Southeast Asia and the serious global security concerns stemming from recent developments in Afghanistan.  The Council demanded that Afghan territory not be used for sheltering, training, planning or financing terrorist acts and called for concerted action against all terrorist groups.  As the terrorist threat in the region continues to remain high, an open briefing on Central Asia is scheduled for the Committee in December.  She also reported that, on 7 April, the Committee organized a joint open briefing with the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee, during which Member States expressed their views on the threat posed by such groups and their affiliates.  They particularly underlined the aim of terrorist groups in Africa to destabilize existing governance structures and take advantage of intercommunal conflict to recruit fighters and secure resources.

On 23 March, the Committee held an open meeting on the need for countering terrorist narratives and the use of the Internet for terrorist purposes, she continued.  It also organized a special meeting in Mumbai and New Delhi between 28 and 29 October on countering the use of new and emerging technologies for such purposes.  Discussions in that meeting focused on the increased threat posed by terrorist use of the Internet and social media; new payment technologies and fundraising methods; and unmanned aerial systems, including drones.  As an outcome of that meeting, the Committee adopted the Delhi Declaration, which aims to enhance the Council’s approach to this threat in a comprehensive, holistic manner.  She also pointed out that the Committee ensured greater participation of women in the special meeting, noting that 40 per cent of the speakers were women and that the panel on information and communication technology featured seven women out of a total of 11 speakers.

She then said that the Committee’s core mandate includes monitoring and assessing the implementation of relevant Council resolutions and facilitating the delivery of technical assistance for capacity-building.  Acting on behalf of the Committee, the Executive Directorate resumed on-site assessment visits in April, conducting 10 such visits in Africa, the Americas, Central Asia, Europe, the Middle East, the Pacific and South-East Asia.  In line with its mandate, it engaged with experts in civil society, academia, think thanks and the private sector to support the Committee’s efforts to advance implementation of relevant Council resolutions.  It also continued to facilitate the delivery of technical assistance to Member States.  Among further initiatives, she reported that the Committee has continued to strengthen its cooperation with the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism and other partners within the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Compact.  The Compact’s online platform now consists of 27 visit reports, including over 800 recommendations for technical assistance needs, she added.

JUAN RAMÓN DE LA FUENTE RAMÍREZ (Mexico), Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004), voiced his full support for the joint statement delivered on behalf of the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee, the Counter-Terrorism Committee and the 1540 Committee.  Resolution 1540 (2004) is a vital component of the global non-proliferation architecture to prevent non-State actors from gaining access to weapons of mass destruction, he emphasized.  The potentially catastrophic consequences from the use of nuclear, chemical or biological weapons by such actors remain a matter of serious concern to the international community.  Although States have made significant progress towards the full implementation of the resolution, this remains a long-term task, requiring enhanced cooperation among the three Committees.

In light of the important areas of complementarity with the other two Committees and in line with resolution 2325 (2016), the 1540 Committee has continued to exchange information and coordinate visits to States, technical assistance as well as other issues of interest.  While the Committee postponed a number of planned activities in 2021 due to the pandemic, it nevertheless continued with its comprehensive review process with States, international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, professional associations and industry making contributions during open-ended consultations.  Following the renewal of its mandate in February 2022, the Committee has continued to promote the full and effective implementation of resolution 2622 (2022); assist States, upon request, on strengthening national capacities; and has participated in 19 outreach activities.

He went on to say that, to date, 185 countries have submitted initial reports on the measures they have taken, or plan to take, to comply with obligations under the resolution.  He noted that States can develop voluntary national implementation action plans, as encouraged by resolution 2325 (2016) to help articulate actions in relation to national regulations and control frameworks, foster inter-agency cooperation and identify areas for further assistance.  The total number of States that have submitted such plans to the Committee since 2007 now stands at 38.

By connecting States requesting assistance with those offering assistance, the Committee plays an important role in facilitating assistance to Member States to fulfil their obligations, he pointed out.  In addition to facilitating requests for assistance, the Committee has continued to work with States to discuss national reporting, national action plans, the Committee’s matrices and assistance to the implementation of the resolution.  Its website also serves as a means of public outreach.  Cooperation and dialogue with Member States are the cornerstones of the Committee’s activities, he stressed.

Statements

JOHN KELLEY (United States) emphasized the need for the three Committees to engage in mutually reinforcing work while avoiding duplication, to better address the increasingly global and diverse threat of terrorism.  However, he expressed concern that a permanent member of the Council is seeking to obstruct cooperation between the 1540 and 1267 Committees and the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, despite their clear mandates for such cooperation.  Over the past year, the terrorism threat has evolved, leading to an uptick in attacks worldwide, he said, urging the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate and the 1267 Monitoring Team to closely monitor threats.  Further, he urged the 1540 Committee to support Member States to control weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery to reduce the risk of terrorist attacks.  He also expressed disappointment that the 1267 Committee has only agreed to designate one entity since the start of the year.  The politicization of such issues only benefits terrorists.  He reiterated the need for cooperation between the 1540 Committee and subsidiary bodies through enhanced information sharing, joint visits to countries, and technical assistance, to help States assess and address threats.  Such knowledge must not be exclusive, he said, calling for the information to be made available to Member States through meetings, websites, and other forms of outreach.

GENG SHUANG (China), commending the 1267 Committee’s Monitoring Team for tracking terrorist threats and issuing reports, said his country highly values the Committee’s work on listing, exemptions and delisting.  To maintain the authority and effectiveness of the sanctions regime, the Committee’s relevant work must be based on solid facts and broad consensus.  Committee members must abide by the principle of confidentiality and avoid leaking any internal information.  On the Counter-Terrorism Committee, he stressed that its broader mandate as a result of the Delhi Declaration should not result in a deviation from its core mandate to combat terrorism.  The Committee should optimize the allocation of resources focused on key issues and direct resources and efforts to supporting Africa and developing countries on capacity.  In addition, the comprehensive review of the 1540 Committee is an important opportunity to strengthen and improve that resolution’s implementation mechanism.  For its part, the 1540 Committee must uphold the leadership of Member States; support developing countries in strengthening non-proliferation capacity-building; enhance the relevance and effectiveness of assistance programs; promote cooperation with relevant agencies and organizations; and improve transparency.  Going forward, all three committees must step up their efforts in information collection and sharing, he said.

ANNA M. EVSTIGNEEVA (Russian Federation), underlining the continued relevance and significance of the 1267 Committee, spotlighted the growing competition between ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida over sources of funding, media resources and new converts.  There is also a struggle for leadership in such groups, mergers and absorptions of some groups and the emergence of new groups drawn to various international terrorist organizations.  Taken together, this has led to an increase in terrorist activity, along with an update in the tactics and methods employed by such groups.  She stressed that one of the Committee’s priority tasks remains expanding the Council’s anti-terrorism sanctions regime to cover individuals and organizations that are members or direct affiliates of the Afghan branch of ISIL (Da’esh).  She also welcomed the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s return to normal working arrangements, noting that it continues to fulfil its important function of evaluating Member States’ implementation of relevant Council resolutions.  Turning to the 1540 Committee, she underscored that resolution 1540 (2004) remains the only universal international document in the area of non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.  It is premised on the notion that all States will create effective national systems of control to prevent such weapons and their means of delivery from falling into the hands of non-State actors.  Noting that the Committee should continue to provide technical assistance in this area as requested, she emphasized that its tasks do not include coercion or imposing its services on Member States.

JUAN RAMÓN DE LA FUENTE RAMÍREZ (Mexico), highlighting the renewal of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate’s mandate, underscored the need for that body to integrate gender issues as a cross-cutting aspect in all its activities.  Further, the upcoming joint briefing with the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism on 30 November should be an open meeting, he stressed.  On the 1267 Committee, he voiced his regret over the lack of agreement on updates to the guidelines for that Committee’s work.  He reiterated his country’s support for the 1267 Committee’s Ombudsperson whose work is critical to providing due process standards for removing individuals from the sanctions list.  Turning to the 1540 Committee, he emphasized that the threat of non-State actors acquiring weapons of mass destruction has not been reduced.  The international community must recognize and consider that new technologies have opened up avenues for the acquisition and use of these weapons.  The comprehensive review process was an opportunity for the Committee’s membership to develop proposals to better equip the body to effectively respond to current challenges, he noted, adding that he hoped the Committee’s mandate will be extended.

MOHAMED ABUSHAHAB (United Arab Emirates) said that as the incoming Chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, his country will build on the efforts undertaken by India, which adopted the Delhi Declaration at a special meeting in October, as a response to the collective threat posed by technologies, including the deployment of uncrewed aerial vehicles.  Efforts by the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee to ensure the full implementation of sanctions must be complemented by a focus on tackling the root causes of terrorism and extremism.  Moreover, he emphasized the need for the international community to avoid inadvertently lending credibility to terrorist narratives which exploit religion to justify their crimes, reiterating his country’s call on Member States and the United Nations system to use ‘Da’esh’ instead of ‘Islamic State’, ‘ISIL’, or ‘ISIS’, “as there is nothing Islamic about terrorism”.  “We should also remember that Da’esh is nothing more than a depraved and nihilistic terrorist group; it is neither a ‘state’ nor a ‘province’, and we should not validate its pretensions,” he stressed.  Turning to the 1540 Committee, whose mandate renewal is due next week, he said the future mandate should include a provision for an inclusive review process on the implementation status of resolution 1540 (2004).

GIDEON KINUTHIA NDUNG’U (Kenya), stressing that the success of the Committees’ work depends on Member States, said that to prevent non-State actors, including terrorists, from acquiring nuclear, chemical or biological weapons or their means of delivery, everyone in the international community must implement their commitments and support their fellow States.  “The evolving nature of the threat posed by terrorists and other non-State actors requires us to be ahead of the curve,” he said, urging Member States to foresee potential risks emanating from new advances in science and technology.  Member States must also implement asset freezes and travel bans on sanctioned individuals, groups and entities so as to curb the planning and execution of terror attacks as well as to combat illicit financial flows involving terrorists and other non-State actors, he said.

TRINE SKARBOEVIK HEIMERBACK (Norway) said that a multilateral strategy is key to a successful response to the global threat posed by terrorism.  The United Nations plays an indispensable role in this regard, as it provides the only global forum in which to coordinate, monitor and evaluate collective efforts in this area.  She emphasized that the comparative advantage of each of the Organization’s relevant entities should be leveraged to create synergies while avoiding duplication of efforts.  She also spotlighted the unintended impact of counter-terrorism measures on humanitarian activities, recalling that the Counter-Terrorism Committee’s Executive Directorate published a report on this issue.  The report found that counter-terrorism measures had a significant impact on humanitarian action in contexts where designated terrorist organizations were present.  She therefore supported the establishment of a standing humanitarian exemption to all United Nations sanctions regimes, also noting that clarifying the scope of the 1267 regime to address this issue “would serve as an example of the coherence we call for in United Nations counter-terrorism efforts”.  She also supported the 1540 Committee as a vital part of the global non-proliferation architecture, noting that advances in science, technology and international commerce impact the risk of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to non-State actors.

RUCHIRA KAMBOJ (India) said that terrorist groups affiliated with ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida, particularly in Asia and Africa, continue to target civilian and security forces.  She recalled, however, that efforts to sanction those involved in the November 2008 attack in Mumbai, who had reached the city from Pakistan via sea, were blocked for political reasons, allowing them to further organize cross-border attacks against India.  Activities of entities listed under the 1267 sanctions regime, and which operate under aliases with State-sponsored hospitality, must be monitored.  She drew attention to the eight-point action plan laid out by the Minister for External Affairs of India, which calls for evidence-based listing and delisting.  She also emphasized the need to extend capacity-building assistance to Member States at risk from terrorism and to bring those jurisdictions up to par with financial and other international standards.  Noting that India is the 2022 chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, she said that its meeting in New Delhi in October highlighted the threats posed by emerging technologies and the urgent need for a comprehensive Council response.  She went on to say that the 1540 Committee should take into account proliferation risks and access to weapons of mass destruction by terrorist and non-State actors.

JOÃO GENÉSIO DE ALMEIDA FILHO (Brazil) noted that when listing requests are submitted to the 1267 Committee, they are presented only with allegations that any given individual or entity fulfils the criteria of association with ISIL (Da’esh) or Al-Qaida, not with proper evidence “except for the back channel of bilateral interagency communications between select partners”.  Listing requirements should be submitted with supporting evidence, so that all Committee members can judge every request on its own merit and avoid the politicization of listing requests.  Listing standards must also be aligned with those applied by the Ombudsperson for the purposes of delisting.  He added that discussion of the Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate’s interim review by the end of 2023 should not be decoupled from the lessons to be learned during the eighth review of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy in mid-2023.  Turning to the 1540 Committee, he said that Brazil is working closely with its Chair and other members to adopt a resolution that strengthens its role in addressing old and new challenges. He also encouraged the Council to continue to adjust its sanctions framework to minimize civilian suffering.

ANNETTE ANDRÉE ONANGA (Gabon) welcomed the sustained engagement by the Committees, which is equal to the scale of the existential threats discussed.  On the 1267 Committee, she welcomed the extension of the mandate of the Monitoring Team in line with Security Council resolution 2610 (2021), given that the global threat posed by ISIL (Da’esh) and their affiliates remains an integral part of the Council’s agenda.  Turning to the 1373 Committee, she looked forward to its upcoming review, which offers an opportunity to examine the threat posed by the use of emerging technologies for terrorist purposes, as flagged by the Delhi Declaration.  On the 1540 Committee, she reiterated the need to consider the concerns of developing countries and expressed her support for attention paid by the Chair to ensure the full, active involvement of female experts.

ALEXANDRE OLMEDO (France), describing Al-Qaeda, ISIL (Da’esh) and their affiliates as the most acute terrorist threat, said the Council should preserve the 1267 sanctions regime’s integrity and effectiveness so that it can fulfil its essential work.  The Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate must have access to all countries and actors, including civil society, to consolidate its robust framework based on respect for human rights and fundamental freedom.  Noting that the Counter-Terrorism Committee enables the international community to reflect on evolving terrorist threats, he warned that the danger of biological, chemical and nuclear materials falling into terrorist hands remains high.  Sensitive materials security, borders controls and export control mechanisms must be strengthened, he said, adding that the mandate of the 1540 Committee and its Group of Exports should be better defined during upcoming negotiations on its renewal.

LAURA GABRIELLE DIX (United Kingdom) encouraged all three Committees to cooperate more closely in tackling the threat posed by terrorist groups and non-State actors.  She commended the 1540 Committee for raising awareness of obligations under resolution 1540 (2004) and encouraged it to provide more support to Member States in addressing proliferation finance challenges.  Underscoring the United Kingdom’s commitment to preventing the proliferation of chemical, biological and nuclear weapons and their means of delivery, she said that if non-State actors use these weapons, the consequences could have severe, global effects.  All States must implement their obligations in full to prevent that, she said.  Turning to the Counter-Terrorism Committee, she expressed appreciation over its focus on emerging technologies, adding that the views of technical experts, civil society, human rights defenders, the private sector and academia are invaluable for the Council’s work to be effective.  Terrorism can only be meaningfully addressed through the effective and coordinated implementation of the Committees’ mandates, she said.

MARTIN GALLAGHER (Ireland) noted with concern that ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaida and their affiliates are increasing in strength throughout Africa, while Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant-Khorasan (ISIL-K) poses a severe threat in Afghanistan, where Al-Qaida operates unimpeded under Taliban rule.  Meanwhile, ISIL (Da’esh) can still mount high-profile attacks in Syria and Iraq, he added.  Calling for readjusted counter-terrorism responses, he said the Council must tackle the underlying drivers of terrorism with preventative whole-of-society approaches.  Too often, human rights are sidelined in counter-terrorism responses, he said, adding that Ireland and the United States have introduced a draft resolution for humanitarian exemptions across all sanctions regimes.  Expressing deep concern that non-State actors are acquiring nuclear and biological weapons, he underscored the importance of cooperation between the 1540, 1267 and 1373 Committees and their respective Groups of Experts.

ARIAN SPASSE (Albania), emphasizing the importance of transparency and welcoming the ongoing practice of joint briefings, said he appreciated the 1540 Committee’s inclusion of various stakeholders, including civil society, in its consultations.  He also expressed strong support for the 1267 Committee’s sanctions regime until such time that basic internationally recognized rights are respected by the de facto authorities in Afghanistan.  He also strongly condemned terrorist violence and ideology and supported all efforts to hold perpetrators to account.  He went on to express deep concern at the dire humanitarian situation at Hawl and other refugee camps where ISIL (Da’esh), Al-Qaeda and other groups are recruiting new members.  Those in positions of power must help protect the most vulnerable, especially women and children, he said.

HAROLD ADLAI AGYEMAN (Ghana), Council President for November, speaking in his national capacity, voiced hope that the stalled review of the 1267 Committee’s working guidelines will be welcomed, and that consensus will be found on that matter, as well as on the renewal of the travel ban exemption for an additional 90 days for listed individuals or entities.  Turning to the 1373 Committee, he endorsed further engagement of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate and the Committee in addressing the growing threat of terrorism in the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and parts of Africa.  Turning to the 1540 Committee, he said the full and effective implementation of resolution 1540 (2004) remains a long-term task given the evolving nature of non-State actors’ activities, as well as advances in science and technology.  As such, the Committee should maintain and further deepen its engagement with Member States through its outreach events to encourage States and civil actors to continue to fulfil their obligations toward adoption of that resolution.

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